Minnesota Twins: Jack Morris, Jim Thome each mention great memories of playing for the Twins in HOF speeches

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COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: (L-R) Inductees Vladimir Guerrero, Trevor Hoffman, Chipper Jones, Jack Morris, Alan Trammell and Jim Thome pose for a photograph with the plaques at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: (L-R) Inductees Vladimir Guerrero, Trevor Hoffman, Chipper Jones, Jack Morris, Alan Trammell and Jim Thome pose for a photograph with the plaques at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) /
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The Minnesota Twins saw two former players, Jack Morris and Jim Thome, enter the haul and praise their time in Minnesota during Sunday’s ceremony.

The Minnesota Twins have likely never seen two players like Jim Thome and Jack Morris steal the hearts of fans in such a short amount of time. Fittingly, both Thome and Morris were part of the 2018 Hall of Fame class. In their speeches, both recall fond memories of their time playing for the Twins.

Morris was drafted by the Detroit Tigers in 1976, made his professional debut in 1977, and played most of his career with the Tigers. And even though Morris spent most of his time in Detroit, and was part of three World Series champion teams over his career, he may forever be best known for his time with the Twins in 1991 and his World Series Game 7 performance.

In his induction speech, Morris quickly references how the St. Paul, MN native grew up always dreaming of following the likes of Harmon Killebrew, Bob Allison, and Rod Carew and one day playing for his hometown Twins. That road to his childhood dream would have to go through Detroit first.

His recollection of his time in Detroit was highlighted by the narration of the first time Morris faced Carl Yastrzemski. Through the retelling, it was clear that Morris is a gifted storyteller and why teams, including the Twins, have employed him as a color commentator for television broadcasts throughout the years.

Of course, Morris had his childhood dream realized as he became a Twin in 1991 where he won a World Series ring and MVP. On Sunday he also officially became the third St. Paul native to have a place in Cooperstown. He joins fellow former Twins Dave Winfield and Paul Molitor with that distinction. Morris’ road to the hall didn’t come without controversy and because of that, you could hear a little bit of different gratitude than most in his voice for being able to stand on that stage.

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Jim Thome’s emotion filled speech

Thome’s year and half in Minnesota just edged Morris in the amount of time spent in Minnesota. It was very evident in his speech that Thome and his family enjoyed their time in Minneapolis starting in 2010 until he was traded midway through the 2011 season.

Thome referred to Minneapolis as one of the greatest cities. Quite a compliment as he spent time in Cleveland, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Baltimore, and his home state while playing in Chicago. Thome also mentioned that he and his wife still reflect on all the great people they met in the city while he was a Twin. He also references the “epic” post-game celebrations as something that he enjoyed especially about his time in Minnesota.

Two things that stood out most in listening to Thome’s speech. First, it is clear how much respect he has for and the credit he gives to his Gulf Coast League manager Charlie Manuel. At one point he gives nearly full credit to his standing on the HOF stage in Cooperstown to Manuel’s work with him. That interaction from Thome on the stage to Manuel in the audience was just one of many moments that put Thome’s authenticity on display. He has to be one of the most genuine people in baseball.

Next. Notable performances of the Twins 2018 draft class. dark

While Morris and Thome may not be “Twins” in the purest form like Kirby Puckett, Harmon Killebrew, and Joe Mauer. The two made their way into the hearts of fans quickly in a short time. That made it exciting to watch the duo receive the highest honor in baseball on Sunday.

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