Minnesota Twins: Comparing current Twins Players with All-Time Greats

Edward Orzech
Rod Carew of the California Angels bats during a game at Comiskey Park. (Photo by Ron Vesely/Getty Images)
Rod Carew of the California Angels bats during a game at Comiskey Park. (Photo by Ron Vesely/Getty Images) /
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Minnesota Twins
Miguel Sano of the Minnesota Twins watches his solo home run against the Detroit Tigers. (Photo by David Berding/Getty Images) /

Minnesota Twins First Baseman compares to…

If there’s one thing you need to know about Miguel Sano, it’s that he crushes baseballs. Every year of his 7 year MLB career, Sano has finished in the top 6th percent in max exit velocity. This has lead Sano to post some impressive home run totals, topping 28 home runs three times while missing a significant amount of games due to injury.

…Hall of Fame Minnesota Twins legend Harmon Killebrew.

Perhaps no one in the history of the league hit the ball harder than Minnesota Twin and Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew. His power was so infamous that Ossie Bluege, the scout (and former Senators player who signed him, said, “He hit line drives that put the opposition in jeopardy. And I don’t mean the infielders, I mean outfielders.”

Sure, Sano and Killebrew share a knack for clobbering the baseball. But the comparisons don’t end there. Both strike out frequently (both have led the league in strikeouts once), and walk often (Killebrew led the AL in walks four times, Sano was in the 78th percentile of walk percentage last year).

Finally, both players have some…struggles defensively. Their large frames regulated them to the corner infield or the occasional corner outfield spots. Killebrew has -78 career defensive runs saved for his career, and Sano will likely fall behind him. He’s already at -49.

However, both Killebrew and Sano are the type of players in which coaches and fans are able to look past their deep flaws to watch their mammoth home run shots sail into the upper deck.

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