Minnesota Twins: 3 Reasons not to Overreact to the team’s Slow Start

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Kenta Maeda of the Minnesota Twins pitches against the Boston Red Sox. (Photo by Brace Hemmelgarn/Minnesota Twins/Getty Images)
Kenta Maeda of the Minnesota Twins pitches against the Boston Red Sox. (Photo by Brace Hemmelgarn/Minnesota Twins/Getty Images) /
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Byron Buxton of the Minnesota Twins celebrates with Nelson Cruz after hitting a home run. (Photo by Brace Hemmelgarn/Minnesota Twins/Getty Images) /

Reason for Optimism for the Minnesota Twins No. 3: Hot Bats

As we mentioned earlier, the Twins have several hitters that aren’t hitting well. Garver and Jeffers are disappointing behind the plate, Polanco hasn’t hit anywhere near what he should, Jake Cave needs to stop taking at-bats, and Miguel Sano has been awful despite improved work in the field.

That doesn’t mean the lineup has been all bad. Luis Arraez has been his normal high-average, clutch self and deserves more credit than he gets. Kyle Garlick has been a pleasant surprise, and deserves FAR more innings than Jake Cave. That’s just the start.

Andrelton Simmons has been excellent so far, hitting .355 before he went down with COVID-19, which is excellent added offense for someone who was brought in for his defense. Nelson Cruz picked up where he left off with a 1.157 OPS and four homers. None of the players has been as successful as Byron Buxton.

Buxton is second in slugging percentage and OPS, third in the MLB in WAR, fifth in homers, eighth in doubles, ninth in total bases, all while sporting one of the best batting averages in the MLB. Buxton’s success has been absolutely excellent, and belongs in the early MVP conversation.

The offense is ranked in the top four in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and fifth in runs. If the bullpen could get it together, the team will get it back on track. I don’t think it’s time to lose hope yet.

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