Minnesota Twins: The Top 5 Shortstops in Franchise History

ojohnson
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 26: Greg Gagne of the Minnesota Twins turns a double play during World Series game six between the Atlanta Braves and Minnesota Twins on October 26, 1991 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Twins defeated the Braves 4-3. (Photo by Rich Pilling/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 26: Greg Gagne of the Minnesota Twins turns a double play during World Series game six between the Atlanta Braves and Minnesota Twins on October 26, 1991 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Twins defeated the Braves 4-3. (Photo by Rich Pilling/Getty Images) /
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Washington Senators
MANHATTAN, NY – 1933: The Polo Grounds, site of the first two games of the 1933 World Series between the New York Giants and the Washington Senators, photographed on September 23, 1933. (Sports Studio Photos/Getty Images) /

No. 2: Cecil Travis

Years: 1933-1941, 1945-1947 (12 Seasons)

Key Stats: 1328 G, 1544 H, 27 HR, 657 RBI, 402 BB, .314 BA, 30.0 WAR, 5.2 dWAR, 4 Top-25 MVP Finishes, 3-Time All-Star, 1933 American League Pennant

Cecil Travis was an absolute star in the 1930’s for the Senators. Travis played in 1,328 games over twelve years and would have played in more if not for his decision to enlist and fight in World War II. Travis was a fantastic hitter and a great leader who helped the Senators through a tough period in franchise history.

Travis’ best skill was his bat, as he hit the ball all over the field, finishing with a .314 batting average over 1,328 games, the eighth-best batting average in team history. He also was excellent at bringing batters home, knocking in 657 RBI, nineteenth in team history.

He didn’t steal a ton of bases, only nabbing 32 over his twelve years, but he legged out 78 triples, tenth most in team history using his solid speed. He used that speed on defense as well, building a 5.2 dWAR, which is twentieth in the franchise record books.

Cecil Travis was a leader for the team as well, finishing in the Top-25 of MVP voting four times, making three All-Star games, and helping the team bring home the AL Pennant in 1933. Travis also showed his value earning a 30.0 WAR, fifteenth in team history.

Travis was a war hero during his time overseas, earning a Bronze Star for his service. When he came back, he struggled due to frostbite and fatigue after the war and wasn’t the same, but he was a truly great player as a Senator and an important leader on the team.

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