Minnesota Twins: Predicting the AL All-Star roster and which Twins should make the cut

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SEATTLE, WA - MAY 18: Outfielders Eddie Rosario #20 of the Minnesota Twins, Byron Buxton #25 and Max Kepler #26 celebrate after a game against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on May 18, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. The Twins won 18-4. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WA - MAY 18: Outfielders Eddie Rosario #20 of the Minnesota Twins, Byron Buxton #25 and Max Kepler #26 celebrate after a game against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on May 18, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. The Twins won 18-4. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images) /
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DENVER, COLORADO – JUNE 01: Starting pitcher Marcus Stroman #6 of the Toronto Blue Jays throws in the fifth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on June 01, 2019 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
DENVER, COLORADO – JUNE 01: Starting pitcher Marcus Stroman #6 of the Toronto Blue Jays throws in the fifth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on June 01, 2019 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) /

Predicting the single player representatives

Before we get to the Twins or any of Baseball’s other top teams, we’ll look at the teams who will only receive one representative and who it will be:

Baltimore Orioles: John Means (3.3 WAR) – Means has been the best player by far on a bad Baltimore team. He’s off to a 7-4 record with a 2.50 ERA, making this the easiest call by far.

Toronto Blue Jays: Marcus Stroman (2.5 WAR) – Ignore Stroman’s record of 5-9, the Blue Jays offer little to no run support. His 3.04 ERA and 77 strikeouts speak to why he’s a prime trade candidate.

Tampa Bay Rays: Charlie Morton (3.0 WAR) – Multiple Rays made good All-Star cases (Tyler Glasnow and Austin Meadows especially) but had injury issues preventing them, so Morton was the only one to make this list. It’s certainly well deserved, as he’s second in the AL in ERA.

Kansas City Royals: Whit Merrifield (2.0 WAR) – I wouldn’t be surprised if Hunter Dozier sneaks in after a really good first half, but on a bad KC team, Merrifield deserves a spot as a part of a rather top-heavy second basemen group.

Detroit Tigers: Shane Greene (1.4 WAR) – Greene has been one of baseball’s best closers playing on one of baseball’s worst teams. He has earned a spot with his 21 saves, ridiculous 0.90 ERA and even more stunning 0.867 WHIP.

Oakland Athletics: Matt Chapman (4.0 WAR) – Chapman has backed up last year’s breakout with an even better season this year, leading a talented A’s team right in the Wild Card hunt. Chapman would be joined by Frankie Montas, but Montas was suspended for PED use and will be ineligible.

Los Angeles Angels: Mike Trout (5.4 WAR) – It’s Mike Trout. No further explanation needed. David Fletcher and Tommy La Stella have been good, but not good enough to join baseball’s best player as All-Stars.

Seattle Mariners: Roenis Elias (0.4 WAR) – Since Edwin Encarnacion was traded, the Mariners really don’t have a player worthy of the All-Star game, so I filled the pitching slot that remained with Elias, the team’s closer who has thus far had a decent year (10 saves, 3.41 ERA).

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